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the-library-and-step-on-it:

The Resurrectionist by E.B. Hudspeth.Book Review by the-library-and-step-on-it


When I first saw this book I was in a bookstore in Liverpool and I fell in love the second I opened it to a random page. I looked, saw, closed it again, and said “yep, you’re coming with me.” The page I saw had an detailed anatomical drawing of a pegasus (you know, a mythological horse with wings), complete with a list of Latin terms for all the different bones and muscles. Have I piqued your interest yet?
The Resurrectionist: The Lost Work of Dr. Spencer Black is part fictional biography, part anatomical sketches, and tells the story of a nineteenth-century surgeon who tries to develop his theory that mythological creatures were our evolutionary ancestors. The biography is fairly dry and not too interesting if you’re already familiar with Frankenstein or H.P. Lovecraft, but thankfully it’s only 65 pages long (warning: the story gets quite gory. Skip if you’re sensitive about vivisection). However, the main appeal of the book are the drawings. They are detailed, well thought out, and look completely believable. If you’ve ever wondered what the respiratory system of a siren looks like, this book can tell you.
The writing may not be very impressive, but the artwork makes this book a great curiosity, perfect if you’re a coffee-table display kind of person or want to trick your children into believing that centaurs are real.
Either.
Both.

Find more reviews here.

the-library-and-step-on-it:

The Resurrectionist by E.B. Hudspeth.
Book Review by the-library-and-step-on-it

When I first saw this book I was in a bookstore in Liverpool and I fell in love the second I opened it to a random page. I looked, saw, closed it again, and said “yep, you’re coming with me.” The page I saw had an detailed anatomical drawing of a pegasus (you know, a mythological horse with wings), complete with a list of Latin terms for all the different bones and muscles. Have I piqued your interest yet?

The Resurrectionist: The Lost Work of Dr. Spencer Black is part fictional biography, part anatomical sketches, and tells the story of a nineteenth-century surgeon who tries to develop his theory that mythological creatures were our evolutionary ancestors. The biography is fairly dry and not too interesting if you’re already familiar with Frankenstein or H.P. Lovecraft, but thankfully it’s only 65 pages long (warning: the story gets quite gory. Skip if you’re sensitive about vivisection). However, the main appeal of the book are the drawings. They are detailed, well thought out, and look completely believable. If you’ve ever wondered what the respiratory system of a siren looks like, this book can tell you.

The writing may not be very impressive, but the artwork makes this book a great curiosity, perfect if you’re a coffee-table display kind of person or want to trick your children into believing that centaurs are real.

Either.

Both.

Find more reviews here.

The avoidant student thinks she has nothing to write about because no one is more boring and dull than she. She writes poems with flat language to mirror her supposedly flat subjects. In extreme cases, she may retreat into fantasy, writing genre-inspired poems populated by vampires or zombies, or simply stall out and refuse to write entirely. Then there’s the student who believes his life is endlessly fascinating. He presents a magnum opus on the subject of his recent breakup. Often this student’s work is so personally coded that it is entirely opaque to readers. In a workshop setting, such poems can be frustrating for everyone involved. To greet these efforts by simply reiterating “write what you know” will seem futile and tone-deaf to these students. They believed, they tried, and it didn’t work. But what is the alternative? Rather than preaching “write what you know,” consider persona poetry. It seems paradoxical, but writing as someone else—exploring what you don’t know—can prove an excellent method of coming to know yourself as a writer. Using a persona allows a student to temporarily shake loose her devotion to portraying her “true” self and be someone else for a while.

Teaching the Persona Poem by Rebecca Hazelton

This article offers a solid basic overview of persona poems and addresses the same problem I have tried to identify here.

Don’t write about yourself. Embrace artifice. Release the shackles of ego and self-awareness.

(via uutpoetry)

(via uutpoetry)